“Reeve Coobs. You only need her to sing one lyric. You instantly feel the authenticity, passion & emotion in her natural gift of song. A fantastic writer, performer and killer guitar player. I also hear she rocks the drums. Ok, now I'm officially jealous. Endless talent in this incredibly humble artist.”

- Pat McGee, The Pat McGee Band


From the online blogazine, Crab Cakes and Lemonade

Reeve Coobs – Charlotte, NC.. “WOW!”  Every now and then you come across a diamond in the rough just waiting to be polished.  Reeve Coobs is that diamond.  Not only does she shine but she has yet to reach her full luster.  Her voice is smooth and substantial.  Her lyrics are rich in emotion and heavy with truth.  Her lyrical style of writing and thoughtful arrangements, coupled with her effortless nature of singing creates a recipe that can only lead to successful career in music.

Many bloggers compare new talent to megastars of the past or present day icons, but Coob’s songwriting style is all her own.  She brings a level of originality to the folk music genre, blending folk, pop, country and rock in a way that few artist have risen to.  In 2005 Reeve won the Creative Loafing of Charlotte Reader’s Pick Award of Best Female Vocalist and after hearing he music you can see why.

Her debut album, “What Love is All About”, was released in November of last year after nine years in the making.  These 14 tracks express a full range of emotions covering playfulness, loss, happiness, self-doubt, depression, love and regret.  In a WGWG interview on Soundcloud, Coobs said she always wanted to be known as a songwriter rather than a singer.  Whether she’s know for her singing and or songwriting, this gem has already been discovered by many loyal followers.

- Dave Hawkins, Crab Cakes & Lemonade Music Blogazine (Feb 2014)  


Years in making, CLT's Coobs sets debut bar high

Singer-songwriter Reeve Coobs has been playing music in Charlotte for over a decade now as a solo artist and in the female quartet the Near Missses, but only released her debut album "What Love is All About" late last year. She plays Evening Muse with Charlie King Thursday.

While many artists today are ready to jump in the studio after writing their first handful of songs, there's something to be said for taking your time. Coobs has devoted years to her craft and it shows on "What Love is All About" - a collection of beautifully sung, fully-realized tunes nine years in the making.

The album begins with the waltzing "Magic Show." Its carnival-feel, sing-songy verses, choice of instrumentation, and the scratchy, muffled, old vinyl sound of the intro presumably inspired the album's playful circus tent cover art and serves as a ear-catching opener. The song opens up with full production and gives listeners an ample taste of what's to come, which is a consistent, cohesive, but still diverse album of striking arrangements, songwriting, and subtle production. 

Coobs has a knack for crafting a pop hook. "To Be With You" is right up there with Shawn Colvin's best work. I wouldn't be shocked to hear "Stranger" scoring a scene on "Grey's Anatomy" or better yet something more youthful and cutting edge like "The Vampire Diaries." The latter climbs from a bluesy, methodical verse to a fiery rock chorus that's built for building suspense and drama. "Goodbye" is another track that worms its way into your memory begging for embarrassing rainy night sing-alongs ("It's Too Late!") in the privacy of your car. 

Coobs shakes up styles enough to keep it interesting while maintaining her sound. She out-right rocks on "Let It Out" and the bluesy "Hopeful Thought" and gets spooky and weird with psychedelic guitar wailing subtly in the background on "I Can't Believe It." 

She can play the intimate, coffee shop folkie too. "Caught" is a stirring and simple sliver of a song built around lovely harmonies. With few words she captures self-doubt, loss, and depression in little more than two minutes. That's the test of a good writer - getting your point across quickly with no filler. At 14 songs you'd assume there'd be filler, but Coobs and co-producer Jeff Williams (of gogoPilot) had plenty of time to refine these tracks with the help of a band of seasoned area musicians (pictured above). It includes pedal steel from much missed Sea of Cortez leader Rodney Lanier on one track. Lanier died almost two years before its release.

There's so much good about this record I can't single out every strong song. There's emotional highs, sassy rock n' roll ones, quiet singer-songwriter confessionals and impressive, soulful vocals. "What Love is All About" is the whole package. It's certainly one of my favorite local releases of the past year.

- Courtney Devores, Charlotte Observer Sound Bites Blog (Jan 2014)



Drunken Werewolf Magazine

"North Carolina's Reeve Coobs has a soulful vocal like no other; understated but also strong and forceful. That's not the star of the show though, oh no; Coobs is a magnificent songwriter, arguably the best we've come across so far on Reverbnation. Lead song "Stranger" and it's unbelievably good hook stands testament and will have Coobs competitors quaking in their boots."
- Tiff Daniels, Drunken Werewolf Magazine (Dec 2013)



Sound Bites Blog

"As a singer-songwriter she’s been a fixture (and one time Near Miss) in Charlotte for years, so it’s surprising that her new album is also her debut. If you’ve seen her folky solo acoustic performances and think you know what to expect, “What Love is All About” is a fully-realized collection that weaves a remarkable voice through a number of subtle genre changes."
- Courtney Devores, Sound Bites Blog (Nov. 1, 2013)
 


Creative Loafing Charlotte

"It's well known in certain Charlotte music circles that one of the best voices in town belongs to Reeve Coobs, familiar to most from her work with the folk oufit the Near Misses. Throughout her Misses' tenure, and as a part-time member of the indie outfit gogoPilot, Coobs' alto stood out for its clarity, power and range.

So when her debut LP, nine years in the making, opens with the waltz "Magic Show" and that voice is processed through effects, it's a clever shake-shit-up move and declaration that we aren't in simple folkie songwriter land anymore.

On these 14 tracks, Coobs surrounds herself with a crack band of locals to pull out the nuance in her songs or kick things into overdrive: Co-producer and gogoPilot leader Jeff Williams provides an array of electric guitar sonics, keyboardist Jason Atkins shades the songs in autumnal colors with organ or piano, and drummers Chris Walldorf and Jonathan Erickson, along with bassist Flavio Magione, deliver a variety of tight tempos from trad rock to twangy shuffles.

Coobs' vocals are still front-and-center, where they should be, donning many moods. She capably delivers the spit and vitriol in rocker "Let It Out" and wails the blues in "Hopeful Thought." But she's just as comfortable with the resignation of an unrequited lover in the Carole King-worthy "Goodbye" or the late-night reverie of "Night Owl," which features pedal steel passes from the late Rodney Lanier.

Coobs made a wise choice in tapping Williams as her co-conspirator. The duo creates bountiful textures that reveal more and more nuance with repeat listens, not unlike the work of, say, Jolie Holland. And, just as key, they've pulled it off without losing sight of the songwriters' vision, proving in the process that Coobs is more than just a pretty voice."
- Album Review by John Schacht for Creative Loafing Charlotte (10/30/13)
 


Charlotte Vibes Music Blog

"Reeve Coobs // The Evening Muse // July 22, 2011

The Deal: Singer/songwriter and vocal powerhouse Reeve Coobs delights a packed house at The Evening Muse.

The Good: Reeve combines the vocal qualities of pop singers like Colbie Caillat and Celine Dion and infuses that sweet-but-soulful energy into folk rock songs that amalgamate the styles of artists like John Mayer and Edwin McCain. The resulting tunes display a songwriting prowess and impeccable vocal control unmatched by any unsigned singer/songwriter I’ve ever seen.

Unbridled by a succinct subgenre definition, Reeve runs the gamut of folk from the pop end to the rock end, picking up some country/Americana sounds on the way. While Reeve’s flawless, live vocals rival the precision and quality of a great studio recording, her talents extend even beyond that to skilled guitar-work and piano-playing. For someone as multi-talented as she, her self-effacing manner of addressing her fans makes her even more charming as a performer—she seems to be so focused on the music, she hesitates to mention her items for sale at the back of the venue. She even apologizes for her lack of happy songs: “Moving from ‘angry’ to ‘sad;’ not too many ‘happy,’ sorry.” Even if most songs are expressing negative emotions and situations in the most beautiful way possible, it’s not all doom-and-gloom; for instance, she touts her catchiest song “Night Owl” as the happiest song she’s ever written, calling it “a love song to staying up late.”

The Bad: Having the chairs out at The Evening Muse kind of cut down the available kinetic energy in the room, I thought. Not to mention it was a claustrophobia-inducing level of crowded in there by the end of Reeve’s set. It wasn’t that she wasn’t putting the energy out there; it was just that, as she said, “You guys are really quiet.” The crowd loosened up a little bit after the first few songs, thankfully.

The Verdict: I am really hard on female singers in my critiques because I know the extent of wonderful things that a woman’s voice can do, and most of the front-women of Charlotte don’t explore that potential — Reeve Coobs exceptionally defies that majority. I’m not even a huge fan of folk rock, as a genre, but the dark caramel tones of Reeve’s voice paired with rock solid songwriting really impresses me. While these beautiful songs could stand alone with just her voice and an acoustic guitar — I’ve seen it work at FemmeFest — the musicians in her band weave a tight net of support, filling out the songs — especially the “angry” ones — for an intense sonic experience."

- Show Review by Amanda Caines for Creative Loafing Charlotte Vibes Music Blog (7/25/11)


 
Creative Loafing Charlotte
 
“Reeve Coobs has a vocal style that can be as easygoing as a comfortable chair one moment and as powerful as a tornado the next. She knows exactly how to express her thoughts and apply the perfect tone to give the words as much meaning as possible.”
 
- Jeff Hahne, Creative Loafing Charlotte (5/17/11)


 
Shutter 16 Magazine
 
By far, the best solo acoustic performance at FemmeFest was not the headliner but Reeve Coobs, who truly blew me away with her powerful choruses and excellent guitar-work. Even my husband, the guitar snob who I dragged along for a male perspective, was impressed with her playing. Her sweet-yet-mighty voice ran the gamut from self-effacing, light folk to robust, head-bobbing blues. 
 
- Amanda Caines, Shutter 16 Magazine

 
Creative Loafing Charlotte
 
"Coobs' blend of folk, pop/rock and country has morphed a bit over the years. Perhaps best known for her co-starring role in the The Near Misses for four years. Coobs and her bandmates took home a armload of Loafing best-of lauds. Currently, she plays and sings with Jeff Williams' ever-interesting gogoPilot (Williams also produces Coobs, and returns the favor by playing in her band as well, along with Atkins, who's manned the keys for numerous local acts, including Lou Ford). That constant gigging has really redefined her sound (and her subtly powerful voice), which is more straightforward and direct than ever ... and I mean that in a good way. Dancing to a song is one of the greatest things ever – dancing around the point of one doesn't help anyone, which Coobs understands."
 
- Tim Davis, Creative Loafing Charlotte (12/22/09)


Charlotte Music Examiner

"Having heard Reeve Coobs perform a couple of times in the past it has mostly been as part of a group of singers or as backup vocals with gogoPilot. Tonight’s solo gig as opener for gogoPilot was a performance which will not soon be forgotten. Reeve’s first couple of tunes held the “genie” in check with muted and tempered vocals. Then something transformational happened! Reeve let the genie out of the bottle and showed a powerful vocal ability with range, depth and emotion unlike anything I’ve heard her let loose in the past. As she showered the audience with  dominant dynamic vocals, it was truly an OMG moment. This was not lost on the full house at the Evening Muse either as the emotions of the audience were aroused and busting at the seams before the song was over and the crowd let loose as the song came to a close! A couple of songs later, Reeve once again impressed the audience with a powerful, confident, rangeful, crisp, melodic vocal demonstration highlighting her capabilities as a vocal soloist! A wonderful performance Reeve!"

- Monty Chandler, Charlotte Music Examiner.com (11/28/09)

 
 

News:

CD RELEASE! 

 Reeve's first CD, What Love Is All About is now finished. Plan to come to the CD release party on November 1st at The Neighborhood Theater.

Great Review of Reeve's Show! 

Reeve Coobs at The Evening Muse by Amanda Caines from Creative Loafing (Vibes Music Blog)
July 22, 2011

The Deal: Singer/songwriter and vocal powerhouse Reeve Coobs delights a packed house at The Evening Muse.

The Good: Reeve combines the vocal qualities of pop singers like Colbie Caillat and Celine Dion and infuses that sweet-but-soulful energy into folk rock songs that amalgamate the styles of artists like John Mayer and Edwin McCain. The resulting tunes display a songwriting prowess and impeccable vocal control unmatched by any unsigned singer/songwriter I’ve ever seen.

Unbridled by a succinct subgenre definition, Reeve runs the gamut of folk from the pop end to the rock end, picking up some country/Americana sounds on the way. While Reeve’s flawless, live vocals rival the precision and quality of a great studio recording, her talents extend even beyond that to skilled guitar-work and piano-playing. For someone as multi-talented as she, her self-effacing manner of addressing her fans makes her even more charming as a performer—she seems to be so focused on the music, she hesitates to mention her items for sale at the back of the venue. She even apologizes for her lack of happy songs: “Moving from ‘angry’ to ‘sad;’ not too many ‘happy,’ sorry.” Even if most songs are expressing negative emotions and situations in the most beautiful way possible, it’s not all doom-and-gloom; for instance, she touts her catchiest song “Night Owl” as the happiest song she’s ever written, calling it “a love song to staying up late.”

The Bad: Having the chairs out at The Evening Muse kind of cut down the available kinetic energy in the room, I thought. Not to mention it was a claustrophobia-inducing level of crowded in there by the end of Reeve’s set. It wasn’t that she wasn’t putting the energy out there; it was just that, as she said, “You guys are really quiet.” The crowd loosened up a little bit after the first few songs, thankfully.

The Verdict: I am really hard on female singers in my critiques because I know the extent of wonderful things that a woman’s voice can do, and most of the front-women of Charlotte don’t explore that potential — Reeve Coobs exceptionally defies that majority. I’m not even a huge fan of folk rock, as a genre, but the dark caramel tones of Reeve’s voice paired with rock solid songwriting really impresses me. While these beautiful songs could stand alone with just her voice and an acoustic guitar — I’ve seen it work at FemmeFest — the musicians in her band weave a tight net of support, filling out the songs — especially the “angry” ones — for an intense sonic experience.

Show Review in Shutter 16 Magazine 

By far, the best solo acoustic performance at FemmeFest was not the headliner but Reeve Coobs, who truly blew me away with her powerful choruses and excellent guitar-work. Even my husband, the guitar snob who I dragged along for a male perspective, was impressed with her playing. Her sweet-yet-mighty voice ran the gamut from self-effacing, light folk to robust, head-bobbing blues. I missed her full-band set since it coincided with Grown Up Avenger Stuff’s time slot but I am eager to find another opportunity to see Reeve with her band.
- Amanda Caines

READ THE WHOLE ARTICLE HERE!